• The Crestiad

Natasha's Nook: "Lets share holiday traditions"


Natasha Hague

Managing Editor


Each family has their own special holiday traditions. As the holidays approach, I begin to reminisce about my own. Thanksgiving and Christmas have always held great memories for me. All my cousins would come to our house and we’d play games and eat dinner. It was the same as a lot of families, we had turkey, mashed potatoes and stuffing. Except most families don’t find a spoon buried in their stuffing. 


“Uhm,” said my cousin Dino scooping a pile of stuffing “There is a spoon in the stuffing.” The spoon lifted another spoon out of the stuffing. We all broke out into laughter at the dinner table. 


Each year my mom would do most of the cooking on her own. My dad and I would wake up early and work on the bird, but she did almost everything else. Thanksgiving can be a hectic day, and in all the chaos my mom forgot to take the spoon out of the pan. Now, whenever we have Thanksgiving with that side of the family, my mom places a spoon in the pan after cooking it and we all wait for Dino to find it. It’s her “secret” ingredient and now one of our funniest traditions.  


One of my family's lazier traditions happens around Christmas time. We had a big living room with large couches that most family members call the “evil couch”. It draws in its victims with a soothing lullaby, the afflicted family member would always say, “just one quick nap.” Then, that’s when the couch gets them. They are out like a light for sometimes hours. It has become a tradition that the first person to fall victim to our evil couch is messed with. 


It is the same sentiment when the first person falls asleep at a sleepover and the kids draw on their face. My family never went to such lengths, but we do take the occasional funny picture next to their sleeping bodies or cover them with a pillow. 


Some traditions stand out to me more than others. As I get older, I have my own traditions that I want to hold on to and eventually pass on to my kids. One of them is the little weenies my brothers and I eat on Christmas Eve. Every Christmas Eve my mom makes us little cocktail weenies tossed in barbeque sauce. My brother Ray would yell across the room, “dog me” and I would run to the kitchen, get a little weenie on a stick and run it back to him. While it seemed to be a slight safety hazard, running with a spear in my hand. I never got hurt and always had a fun time. 


The other tradition I hope to pass down to my kids is watching anime Christmas Eve. I would always sit with my brother Alex and we would watch a long marathon of our favorite anime. It killed time when we were young and impatient for Christmas morning. As adults, it’s a special bonding time that we share. We would set up in his room and get lots of snacks. Our cat Jude would follow us in always carefully watching along with us. I think he really liked the colors and flashing lights. It’s a simple tradition that I look forward to every year. 


I miss my cousins and brothers a lot during the holidays. They were always around while I was growing up and now that I live in Pennsylvania, I don’t really get to see them. They have their own families and live in Minnesota, but I always remember the happy traditions I had with them. 


I know that holidays can be a hard time for college students. Not everyone has the luxury of being able to see their loved ones all together. As we get older, families drift apart and some members pass away. I am finding holidays a lot harder than they used to be. Holding on to those traditions and making the most of our time with our families and loved ones is so important. 


What I find helps me is talking about them as often as I can. You can try it out too. Send in your family traditions to the Crestiad to be featured on our paper’s website.

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